Ure Museum Database



Browse
There are 5 objects for which Comparanda contains → such
13.10.23 Almost identical to Quebec, Musée de l'Amérique Française inv. 1991.1711: CCA 16 (1996) 132 no. 493. V. Karageorghis notes that such alabastra made of local gypsum (a material used since the Late Bronze Age) are common in the Salamis Necropolis throughout the Classical period: Excavations at Salamis 3 (1973) 197. Compare also to a 'false alabastron' made of limestone in Sydney, Nicholson Museum 47.342 (Cambridge Loan no. 103): CCA 20 (2001) 123 no. 346 and some such alabastra found at Salamis: V. Karageorghis, Excavations at Salamis IV.1-2 (1970) 86 no. 8, pls. CXIII and CCXXXVII (Cellarka) 2008.03.0042.jpg
51.1.3 Cf. Hayes 1984, 9 no. 9; CVA Louvre 1, IIID, pl. 1.1, pl. 2.2; Clara Rhodos 3.104, fig. 193; CVA Tours (France 30) pl. 2.4-5. P. Mingazzini, Vasi della Collezione Castellani 1.188-89, and B.B. Shefton, Perachora 2.384 n. 3 list more such kraters. 2005.88.0055.jpg
REDMG:1964.1622 For shape RM.25.53.23. For such tapering 'cucumber', survivals of the Late Corinthian Archaic type see Corinth 13, 140-41, fig. 15, e.g. Corinth T1243: Corinth 13, 223 no. 281-5, pl. 40. Typically Corinthian foot. Cf. also (banded) Attic olpai: Agora 12, pl. 12. Many jugs of similar shape (local imitations?) were found in Sicily, e.g. Agrigento, although many without distinct bases. For comparanda, however, see Veder Greco 295 (an example with a slightly upcurving handle, from Contrada Pezzino, tomb 1316). 2004.99.0150.jpg
REDMG:2004.96.1 The palmettes above the chain are reminiscent of palmette-lotus above chain bands on black figure lekythoi, except that between each five-leaf palmette is a single frond (lotus petal?). Cf. E. Vanderpool, “The rectangular rock-cut shaft. The upper fill,” Hesperia 15 (1946) pl. 62, no. 219. Several such kylikes were found at Corinth; cf. T3162 from North Cemetery grave 262: Corinth 13, pl. 36. 2004.99.0960.jpg
REDMG:2004.98.1 Reading 11.10.2. For such 'palmette lekythoi' see Haspels, ABL 185 f. 2004.99.0926.jpg
The Ure Museum is part of
The University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 217, Reading, RG6 6AH