Ure Museum Database



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There are 6 objects for which Decoration contains → apparent
13.10.13 Marks still apparent from use of wheel but no decoration. 2008.99.0131.jpg
2007.10.2.245 A bearded, muscular, and semi-naked seated figure. His clothing is possibly an animal skin (paws seem to be apparent). He appears to be resting as his right arm rests on his knee and his right hand supports his bowed head. He is also holding an unidentified object in his right hand which also rests against his leg. His other hand appears to be holding a further (unidentified) object which rests across his lap. A club rests against his left thigh in the foreground of the scene. There is either a bull or cow depicted by the figure's right leg at the bottom-left of the scene. The figure shown is almost certainly Herakles, possibly resting after one his labours (herding the cattle of Geryon?).
34.8.12 The vase is black, both on the inside and the outside, with the exception of few, red lines. A sloping rim allows the lid to sit over the aperture. There is a reserved line on topside of the body, a red, carved circle and a groove around. There are also two, concentric carvings, one in the middle of the body's upper surface and the other one at its side. At the level where the body is divided in two areas there is a reserved line, while another one is apparent at the point where the body is narrower, above the point where it connects with the stem. The latter is divided in two areas by two, plastic, thin, red rings. Below, there are vertical ridges, one third the way down, wider towards the upper surface of the foot, whose larger part they cover with their moulded, tongue-shaped terminations. There is also a carved circle, surrounding these terminations. The foot is grooved and reserved in places. The surface underneath is irregularly painted black, with the central part reserved. 2005.88.0067.jpg
E.23.2 Funerary stele with vulture wings surrounding the solar disk, common during the time period. Below the wings is the text of the stele, surviving intact. Two men are depicted adoring the god Re-Horakhty, whose presence is indicated not only by the uraeus and sun disk but also his name inscribed in the text. It has been suggested that the dress of the figures indicates that they are Nubians; this is confirmed by the oddity of their personal names. The sky is depicted above the winged disk, each end being supported by the symbol of the west (on the left, only the top of the feather survives) and the east (on the right, more or less complete). A signature, possibly belonging to Flinders Petrie has been found above the head of the right hand figure. There is only one viable interpretation possible, when one combines the depictions with the details found within the text. The stele depicts the man Serep and his son Tkr-Irt-Hrw, not as has been assumed Serep with his Ka. A personal Ka has no need of the title m33 khrw, which is a title of the deceased, thus two deceased are depicted. There is no question that Serep is a man as he is depicted in male dress and has the male symbol after his name. There is enough evidence to show that the stele was once painted. Red pigment on the sun disk of the god is the most apparent, though a similar (if not the same) is found in several of the hieroglyphics and on the deceased as well as faint traces on the column to the right. A yellow stain remains in the first two columns, which could be remains of the paint used to fill in the columns. The combination of colours matches well with the red pigment found in the glyphs. 2007.99.0044.jpg
E.47.1 On three quarters of the shoulder a wreath surrounding the discus, the other quarter is sections by two ridges and a small lanceolate relief points to the wick hole. Red colouring still apparent in very small amounts on the relief and a small section on the base of the nozzle. 2005.01.0328.jpg
E.65.17 Amulet shaped like the Ibis bird. The details are unclear but it is apparent that the neck cranes down so that the head sits on the body. The hole for threading is attatched to the neck. The whole bird sits on a flat base. 2002.98.0948.jpg
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