Ure Museum Database



Browse
There are 5 objects for which Decoration contains → belonging
14.9.32 Fragment with part of handle, probably belonging to a large vase. Interior is coarse and coloured red although undecorated. The exterior surface has a design of dull black with bands of white. There is a heavy white band round base of handle. Handle round in section. Surfaces are most uneven. 2007.03.1239.jpg
14.9.33 Fragment belonging to the rim of a vase made of fine fabric. Dull black paint inside and out. The exterior surface had white band around rim above spirals or tendrils with three horizontal bands below. The interior had a white band round rim. The material gets thinner at the rim. 2007.03.1235.jpg
26.2.74-75 Framed tongues, red on black and plain black alternately, with the top part of a tall cap, perhaps belonging to a Persian or an archer. 2013.04.0174.jpg
E.23.2 Funerary stele with vulture wings surrounding the solar disk, common during the time period. Below the wings is the text of the stele, surviving intact. Two men are depicted adoring the god Re-Horakhty, whose presence is indicated not only by the uraeus and sun disk but also his name inscribed in the text. It has been suggested that the dress of the figures indicates that they are Nubians; this is confirmed by the oddity of their personal names. The sky is depicted above the winged disk, each end being supported by the symbol of the west (on the left, only the top of the feather survives) and the east (on the right, more or less complete). A signature, possibly belonging to Flinders Petrie has been found above the head of the right hand figure. There is only one viable interpretation possible, when one combines the depictions with the details found within the text. The stele depicts the man Serep and his son Tkr-Irt-Hrw, not as has been assumed Serep with his Ka. A personal Ka has no need of the title m33 khrw, which is a title of the deceased, thus two deceased are depicted. There is no question that Serep is a man as he is depicted in male dress and has the male symbol after his name. There is enough evidence to show that the stele was once painted. Red pigment on the sun disk of the god is the most apparent, though a similar (if not the same) is found in several of the hieroglyphics and on the deceased as well as faint traces on the column to the right. A yellow stain remains in the first two columns, which could be remains of the paint used to fill in the columns. The combination of colours matches well with the red pigment found in the glyphs. 2007.99.0047.jpg
REDMG:1964.1684.1 Three pieces belonging to same object but not adjoinng. All reserved. One piece has a small pinched handle attached. All pieces have a rim, suggesting the original object had a lid. 2006.20.0272.jpg
The Ure Museum is part of
The University of Reading, Whiteknights, PO Box 217, Reading, RG6 6AH