Ure Museum Database



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There are 13 objects for which Shape_description contains → 2
11.10.21 If the foot is restored correctly this is a variant of Ure's type K 2 (Ure 1927, 68), which is the most common Haemonian skyphos, as judged by the Agora material: cf. Agora 23, 60, esp. no. 1516, pl. 103 (with the same type of foot); ABV 565-71, 598-710 Slightly concave black rim; shallow bowl with flat underside; moulded ring foot, with concave inner surface. 2008.99.0780.jpg
13.10.1 Rat-tanged dirk (sword blade used as a dagger or spearhead), with long thin blade, pointed at both ends, with sloping shoulders. A rib runs nearly the full length of the piece (flattened in the last 2 cm of the blade end). The middle of the rib, near the attachment end, is thin, rhomboidal in section, narrowing to pointed tip or tang which is turned up slightly at the end. Approximately 1/4 down the length of the blade the flange broadens, so that two flat sides spread from the centre rib. The blade end of the dirk has nearly straight sides, but tapers gently to a rounded tip. Catling's type 1d; near ├ůstrom's type I4. As Catling suggests (1964, 56) the rat-tailed weapon, the most characteristic of prehistoric Cypriote metal forms, occurs in so many sizes that it is impossible to classify them as swords, dirks, daggers, or even spearheads. 2007.99.0100.jpg
2006.12.103 4 small protrusions, roughly evenly spaced. 2 seem to be from a broken handle. 2007.03.1002.jpg
2008.8.2 Trapezoidal fragment with 2 parallel curved edges.
22.3.40 Downturned molded rim, from which projects the horizontal element of a ridged strap handle that curves back in and descends to the shoulder. Body drops sharply from shoulder and tapers to raised base. Cf. several examples in Lipari 2, esp. Lipari 2, 138, pl. CXXXVI.4a (tomb 385, 'stile Gnathia') 2003.37.0005.jpg
34.10.13 Squat lekythos. Flared mouth with flat rim. Thin neck with single curved handle attached at top and finishing at shoulder. Ridge separates the neck from the shoulder. Cf. Agora 12 part 2, no. 1138, pl. 38 2003.97.0474.jpg
34.10.15 Gourd-shaped vessel, with an elongated ovoid body tapering into a cylindrical handle that finally terminates in elongated, rounded tip. Pierced in the bottom of the ovoid part, and ca. 2 cm from the tip. Use as a rattle is indicated by the sound of a pebble inside. 2004.95.0115.jpg
35.5.27-29 Fragments, 1 consisting of seven pieces joined, 2 of two, 3 of three, probably all from one cup. 2003.21.0073.jpg
46.9.1 'Little lion' shape. Shallow, flaring mouth; thin neck from the top of which a single strap thin handle curves down to the flat shoulder; slight ridge between neck and shoulder; body tapers down to disk foot; base flat with central concave circle. Cf. Agora 12 part 2, no. 1115, pl. 38 2003.92.0149.jpg
50.4.18 Nearly identical to a lidded mug excavated from the Pantanello Necropolis at Metaponto, published by Maria Elliott, in Carter 1998 2.643, fig. 14.2, 667 M3 (T 128-2): the Pantanello mug, which Elliott describes as an 'odd mug' and probably a local imitation of the late 5 c. Attic double handle mug (667), has a knotted handle which is otherwise similar to ours in contour and thickness. For less close comparanda cf. Morel 1981, type 5345a (citing examples from Capua and environs, e.g. CVA Capua 3, Italia 1312 no. 2: less squat, but similar); these Campanian examples are dated to ca. 300. Convex lip with rounded outturned rim, to which is joined a vertical strap handle, tripartite, with two projections on either side of the rim attachment. The handle loops and reattaches at the top of the bulging, ribbed body (ribbing visible on the interior). Tall angled ring foot, the interior of which has an incised spiral (not visible on exterior). 2010.98.0291.jpg
50.4.22 The bowl is a variant of Hoffmann's shape III (see H. Hoffmann, Tarentine Rhyta [Mainz 1966] 2) but the bowl is unusually aligned with the animal head. The Reading example corresponds to Hoffmann's 'main group' of Tarentine ram's-head rhyta, and particularly to his group E, which is 'the first wholly naturalistic representation of the ram-head', which he ascribes to the 'hand of Coroplast Beta' 2003.92.0306.jpg
51.4.9 The rim is conical, strap small handle connecting the enck with the shoulder, is banded with an inflated back, shoulder curving slightly upwards, the body is ovaloid, tapering down to a torus foot, conical underneath. Cf. Agora 12 part 2, no. 1117, pl. 38 Cf. "Sixth and Fifth Century Pottery", P.N.Ure (ed.), p43 shape class E, pl. 14 nos. 130.108 & 127.59 2013.99.0165.jpg
77.5.1.1-17 Seventeen fragments from the same Nikosthenic amphora. 1) Should be rejoined to 2. Part of the body. There is white plaster on both surfaces . 2) Should be rejoined to 1. Part of the body. There are traces of plaster on both sides and adhesives. 3) Part of the body. White plaster and adhesives on both sides. 4) Part of the body. White plaster on both sides and adhesives. 5) Should be rejoined to 6. Part of the body. Adhesives. 6) Should be rejoined to 5. Part of the body. Exterior: There are areas that have been chipped off and few bits that have been pitted off. Interior: There is a layer of white plaster. 7) Could be rejoined to 8? Part of the body. There are bits that have been pitted off on the exterior and the interior is covered with plaster and adhesives. 8) Could be rejoined to 7? Part of the body. White plaster and adhesives on the interior and traces of plaster on the exterior, where there are also bits that have been pitted off. 9) Should be rejoined to 10. Part of the body. White plaster on both surfaces. 10) Should be rejoined to 9. Part of the body. The interior is covered with white plaster and there are traces of it on the exterior. 11) Should be rejoined to 12. Part of the body. The interior is covered with plaster and adhesives, while there are traces of plaster on the exterior, too. 12) Should be rejoined to 11. Part of the body. The interior is covered with plaster and adhesives, while there are traces of plaster on the exterior, too. 13) Should be rejoined to 14. Part of the neck. There are traces of white plaster on the interior. Many bits have been pitted off from boith surfaces. 14) Should be rejoined to 13 and 15. Part of the neck. There are traces of plaster and adhesives on both sides, as well as many bits that have been pitted off. 15) Should be rejoined to 14. Part of the neck. There are traces of white plaster on both surfaces, as well as adhesives. There are few scratches on the exterior and several bits that have been pitted off, especially from the interior. 16) Part of the body. Adhesives and traces of white plaster. There are areas on the exterior, where the colour appears to have been peeled off and some pitting off. 17) Bit of white plaster-part of rim? and covered with adhesives. 2005.91.0037.jpg
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