Ure Museum Database



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There are 5 objects for which Shape_description contains → example
13.10.4A-B Two slightly concave disks, not joined (although they sit together well). The lid is thinner than the base with no significant rim, but a beveled edge. The mirror itself has a rim on the underside, and an offset edge on the upper part. These are clearly two parts of a Hellenistic mirror with lid, typical of Hellenistic cyprus. A pair of bronze plates could be locked together because one mirror had a low cylindrical rim into which the other, with a flanged edge, could be fitted. The inside mirror is decorated on the recessed side and polished on the flat side. The outside mirror is polished on the recessed side and sometimes decorated on the flat side. The two polished sides would then lie together, sometimes plated with silver (as in the case of an example in Amathus tomb 62, published in Excavations in Cyprus). For the Greek prototypes see See A. Schwarzmaier, Griechische Klappspiegel: Untersuchungen zu Typologie und Stil (Berlin 1997). 2010.99.0120.jpg
48.11.8 This shape was particularly popular at Agrigento, where many tombs contained one example (it is called 'brochetto attingitoio' or juglet for drawing liquids, comparable to the attic 'chous'): see especially Veder Greco, Contrada Mosè: 264 (tomb 3); Contrada Pezzino: 306 (tomb 582), 348 (tomb 238), 352 (tomb 779), 353 (tomb 1086), 354 (tombs 585 and 1147), and 355 (tomb 1225). Cf. also Lentini 61613/E (top half glossed) and 61569/B (smaller): Lagona 1973, 86-87 nos. 185 and 186, pl. 30. 2003.92.0398.jpg
50.4.22 The bowl is a variant of Hoffmann's shape III (see H. Hoffmann, Tarentine Rhyta [Mainz 1966] 2) but the bowl is unusually aligned with the animal head. The Reading example corresponds to Hoffmann's 'main group' of Tarentine ram's-head rhyta, and particularly to his group E, which is 'the first wholly naturalistic representation of the ram-head', which he ascribes to the 'hand of Coroplast Beta' 2003.92.0308.jpg
60.1.1 Pagenstecher lekythos: cf. a more elaborate example from Lipari, 'scavo XXXV': Bernabo Brea and Cavalier 1997, fig. 108 (middle) 2003.99.0032.jpg
REDMG:1964.1631 Very thin walls, with rounded rim, just below which are attached horizontal handles. Walls slightly concave, divided from a spreading, lipped torus ring foot, with a pointed resting surface, by a pair of grooves. This example corresponds to Ure's Class II.C skyphos, particularly (ii) which includes reddish-purple bands just below the level of the handles, perhaps a band at the bottom of the body where it joins the ring foot, and concentric purple bands on the underside (or plain black or reserved undersides). See Ure 1927, 24.
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